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CSA Cooking: Vegetarian Lasagne

co-op food
I received my first CSA share this past week. CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. Our family purchases a half share in a local farm (about a 50 minute drive from our home). Once per week throughout the growing season (mid-to-late October here in Northern Utah) the shares are taken to several locations throughout the Salt Lake Valley. Our pick up point is about a mile from our home.

Surprisingly, this is the first year that I've made the effort to join a CSA which has many benefits, including keeping local agriculture alive and healthy (increasingly important as we reach peak oil) and challenges me to add more vegetables to my family's diet which is great for our health and that of the planet. The upfront cost was about $200 for our half-share weekly box of food.

It turns out our half share is more than my family can eat - at least this week. It might be worth sharing some of the abundance with our neighbors.

This week's share included a lot of leafy greens, among them something called Tat Soy which the sheet that came with our share suggested we use in stir fry -- which we did the first night but there was still a lot of the stuff left.

So today I decided to make a variation of Vegetarian Lasagna with the Tat Soy. This would work well with most cooking greens like spinach or chard.

I'm not into exact amounts for recipes, I'm better at estimation and improvisation. I like to use the oven-ready lasagna noodles.

 I improvised an Italian tomato sauce using a large 28 oz. can of crushed tomatoes with basil and a small 14.5 oz. can of diced tomatoes to add chunkiness. I added this to 3 cloves of garlic that I had minced and sauted in olive oil. To this I added liberal amounts of dried oregano and garlic powder and let it simmer in a medium sized saucepan.

For filling, and to reduce the amount of dairy we would normally consume with lasagna, I used 1 package of Mori-Nu organic silken tofu in shelf-stable packaging. I used a fork and mashed the tofu until it was roughly the consistency of cottage cheese.

For two of the layers I was able to use quite a bit of the tat soy I had chopped up (I removed most of the stems, because I was unsure how they would cook in this dish) and the mashed tofu. For 1 of the layers I also added 1/2 tube polenta thinly sliced and quartered (I recently discovered how fantastic polenta tastes with pasta and tomato sauce and wanted to try it in this version of lasagna). My cheese addiction made it too tempting not to add quite a bit of mozzarella and parmesan cheeses to the top layer.

I found that I had made too much sauce, so I sliced the remaining 1/2 tube of polenta and layered in in a bread pan with olive oil, remaining tomato sauce and grated mozzarella and cheddar cheese and baked it at the same time as the lasagna.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
lumubase
Apr. 8th, 2011 08:54 pm (UTC)
Thanks for an idea, you sparked at thought from a angle I hadn’t given thoguht to yet. Now lets see if I can do something with it.

melvaycoq
Oct. 31st, 2011 06:18 pm (UTC)
Great read! I wish you could follow up to this topic

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )